Balsamic Salmon Sliders

Barbecuing might seem intimidating, but it shouldn’t be.  The dishes you can make using your BBQ are endless.  Today’s recipe is simpler than you might think, thanks to your trusty grill.

salmon sliders

To make these delicious seafood sliders, start by preparing your salmon.  Start with a boneless, skinless filet of salmon.  Take out a large sheet of aluminum foil.  Set your grill to medium heat.  Create a dry rub using salt, pepper, red pepper flakes, and garlic salt.  Rub your salmon filet with these ingredients.  Place your salmon filet on the large sheet of foil.  Next, heavily drizzle balsamic vinegar over the salmon.  Add pats of cold butter on top of and around the salmon filet.  Cover the salmon completely by folding over the aluminum foil.  Place the foil directly on top of your grill.  Let the salmon cook on medium heat for 20 to 30 minutes.

While your salmon is cooking, you can begin to prepare the biscuits and cabbage slaw.  You can make biscuits from scratch, or take a shortcut by using the ready to bake kind found in your local freezer section.  I used Pillsburry flaky layers biscuits.  Using a biscuit that flakes easily is important, because you’ll be dividing them in half to make each slider.  Bake the biscuits per package instructions.  To make the slaw, start by making the simple dressing.  Mix four table spoons of olive oil and vinegar.  Add black pepper and crushed red pepper flakes.  Next, take shredded cabbage, and blend in bowl with dressing.

When your biscuits have cooled, pull them apart creating two equal pieces.  Do this to each of your biscuits.  You can add a slice of your favorite cheese.  I used provolone cheese.  Place the salmon on top of the bottom biscuit.  Add your cabbage slaw, and place the second biscuit piece on top.  And you’re done! Enjoy.

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Recipes: Chicken Soup for the Soul

chicken noodle soup

Making home made chicken noodle soup is a lot easier than you think!  My recipe is quick, easy, and only consists of a few simple ingredients.

Why make chicken noodle soup from scratch when it’s so easy to dump it out of a can?  When you ditch fresh food items for condensed sodium filled canned foods you increase your risk for heart disease, kidney stones, osteoporosis and more.  Not to mention the cost of buying canned soups is higher than purchasing whole ingredients instead.

So without further ado, let’s get cooking!

Ingredients:

Two boxes of low sodium chicken stock

1 bunch of celery or 1 package of cut celery

1 package boneless skinless chicken breast strips

salt

pepper

1 package angel hair pasta

By purchasing low sodium chicken stock you control how much salt you add to your soup.  You can certainly use regular boneless skinless chicken breast.  I opt for the breast strips, because it cuts down on the cooking time, and there’s less breaking up of the chicken involved.

Directions:

1) Poor the chicken broth into a deep pot with a lid.

2) Set the heat to low to medium, and let boil.

3) When chicken broth is boiling, add 1 package of angel hair pasta.

4) Remove the chicken breast strips from the package, and season with salt and pepper.  Season to taste.

5)  Add olive oil to a shallow pan.  Cook the chicken on low heat until cooked through.  Cook the chicken on low heat to avoid burning or browning the chicken.  When the outside of the chicken is white, and the inside is cooked through, your chicken is done.

6) While the chicken is cooking cut and clean your celery into desired pieces.

7) Remove the chicken from the pan.  If the pan is dry, add two teaspoons of olive oil to the pan.

8) Add your chopped celery to the pan, and cook until the celery is slightly soft.

9) Cook your pasta until it is soft, not too aldente.  This usually takes around 8 minutes.

10) Add your chicken and celery.

11) Let simmer on low heat for about five minutes.

12) Your soup is ready!

13) Enjoy!

Check back with Meeshme.com for more recipes!

 

Skip the Chain Restaurant Game

Cook at home

You Get to Lick the Bowl

Sure cooking at home takes a little more work than driving to the Cheesecake Factory, but the results are worth the effort.

1) Mo Money in Your Pocket.

Eating out gets expensive, and these aren’t the times to be squandering your pennies on a meal you could create at home.  Cooking can become expensive as well, but if you are smart about how you shop, you can definitely save a couple hundred dollars a month.  There are few dishes that a restaurant can make at lower cost by purchasing in bulk, but most meals can be made at home at lower cost.  Certain conveniences like pre-cut vegetables and fruits, and frozen pre-made meals can get pricey, so if you’re on a budget you will get much more for your buck by cutting your own produce.

2) Get Fresh with Me.

You would be surprised to learn how many restaurants use Campbell’s soup, or packaged pre-made sauces.  If you’re going to eat these pre-made items, why would you spend $15 to $20 on a night at an Italian restaurant when you could spend $5 and eat from home.  Those chain restaurants you love get their meals from test kitchens.  A chef prepares the meals in a test kitchen ahead of time, the meals get packaged, frozen and shipped to your chain location where they then proceed to microwave your order.  Doesn’t sound to appealing does it? Not to mention the fact that places like TGIFridays sells these same items at your local grocery store, and you can microwave the dish yourself and skip the tip.  Taking the time to pick out fresh produce, meats, and cheeses will taste so much better on your plate.

3) That has HOW many calories?

Now that it’s pretty standard to display calorie amounts on restaurant menus, life has become pretty depressing.  I find it very difficult to enjoy eating out when I can see that my one dish has more calories than I should be eating in an entire day.  As someone who has lost over 85 pounds, calorie counting became an important part of my life.  From the age of 16 I started researching how many calories are in food items.  I know that a bean and cheese burrito I make at home has less than 300 calories, so why is it up to 900 calories when you eat out? And there is just NO reason why a salad should ever have 1,000 calories.  When you prepare your own meals at home you can cut so many unwanted calories.  Try cooking from home for one month, and see how much weight you lose.

4) Tip Yourself

Tipping has always been an interesting topic for me.  I have a set of tasks I have to accomplish at work every day.  Whether I am friendly and smile all day, or act grumpy, I’m going to get paid the same amount.  If I decide to bring my boss his cup of coffee, or ask if he would like a refill, I’m not going to get paid any more.  As a waiter/waitress you are being paid to serve people drinks and food.  It is in your job description to bring them what they ask for, and check up on them.  That is your job.  The restaurant owner should be paying you an adequate salary for performing your job tasks.  It shouldn’t be up to me to make up the difference for what your boss stiffs you on.  Are you going to pay me extra when you see my ads on Google, because you think I’m not being paid enough for what I do? I don’t think so.  That being said, I always tip around 18%. I know how it feels to struggle, and I’d be embarrassed if I tipped any less than what was standard.  If I’m on a budget I won’t go to a restaurant.  I won’t stiff on the tip, I just won’t go.  If I make my own meal, I get the credit and I can save my tip.

5) The Wait

When I get really hungry I might as well be lost on an alien planet. I know I’m hungry, but I’m lost as to what I want to eat.  I know I need food in me now, but that’s about it.  My patience grows very thin, I feel weak, and I sometimes want to cry.  So dramatic, but it’s true.  When I’m hungry, and I walk into a restaurant where the hostess tells me it’s going to be 30 minutes to an hour for me to be seated, I want to throw my purse at her.  Not only do you have to wait to be seated, you have to wait for the server to get to your table, take your order, get the food prepared, then bring it to you.  In all that time I could have just fixed myself a sandwich at home in under 10 minutes.